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people saying, how can we afford this right now? we've got to use our resources for the deficit. first, i want everyone to understand the source of our deficit, because if you do not understand that, argument will not make sense. when i walked into the white house, i have people waiting for me at the door, a 1.3 trillion dollar deficit. 1.3 trillion dollars. i say that -- this was not -- and this is not, by the way, entirely the previous administration's fault. the financial crisis was so bad that revenue plummeted and all of this money was spent in making sure that the banking system did not completely collapsed. so all of the actions that have been taken just spite the deficit. but the problem actually is not that -- the extraordinary steps we've taken over last one or two years. the real problem is much longer. even if we had no fiscal crisis whatsoever, we have a structural deficit, we are spending more money than we're taking in, we have been doing it for the last eight years. when we passed the prescription drug benefit for medicare by a republican congress, they did not pay for it.
you for being with us. . . live sunday at noon eastern on book tv's "in-depth is out of -- in-depth." >> this is "america and the courts." sonia sotomayor moved one step closer to being confirmed for the supreme court thursday. a vote was made to send her nomination to the full senate for a vote. the committee largely voted along party lines, with lindsay graham the only republican voting for her. they will take up the full vote next week. >> do we have a quorum? i want to thank all members of the committee for their cooperation. two weeks ago, during our hearings on the nomination of judge sotomayor, the supreme court got a chance to ask questions, also to raise concerns. it gave the nominee an opportunity to respond to relentless criticism, having had to remain silent for the two months prior to the hearing. it gave her her chance to half a public voice, and allowed the american people to see and hear for themselves. it is interesting that during those four days, almost 2000 people attended a hearing in person in this room. millions more solid, heard it, read about it, there
the statutory ban on indecent broadcasting. the band, repeated, and the liberal use of sexually explicit or excretory terms on the airwaves, but it allowed for fleeting expletives to get away. fleeting expletives is a great name for a rock band, if you have teenagers. the sec amended their policy to say that after a couple highly publicized incidents in which first brought up, then share, then mikheil retreat 0-- bono, cher, and nicole richie, the revisited their opinion, and they said that the fcc should ban those words. the only issue coming to the court was an administrative procedure act issue. it did not reach a first amendment question, or the question of whether fcc versus pacific debt should be revisited or overruled. you all remember that. an fcc sanctioned against george carlin's monologue on the seven dirty words, where he took every opportunity to say them on the air. in a petition to joseph stevens, the sanction was upheld, suggesting that this type of language is not at the core of the first amendment, and in any event, broadcasting is different, because it is uniquely perv
." thursday, the u.s. senate voted to confirm the nomination of sonia sotomayor to the supreme court 68-31 with nine republicans joining the democrats. next, highlights from the senate floor debate. sotomayor's nomination, but first i'm going to be joined by several of my esteemed fellow women senators, including senator shaheen of new hampshire, who is here already. senator stabenow of michigan. senator gillibrand from new york. and senator murray of washington state. we all know that this nomination is history-making for several reasons, but one of them, of course, is that judge sotomayor will be only the third woman to ever join the supreme court of the united states of america. we know she's incredibly well-qualified. she's got more federal judicial experience than any nominee for the past 100 years. that's something that's remarkable. but i do think it's worth remembering what it was like to be a nominee for this court as a woman even just a few years ago. it's worth remembering, for example, that when justice o'connor graduateed from law school, the only offer she got from law fir
, it is for all of us a very special time in our own lives, in your life, in the life of our country. we begin in the name the father and the sun and of the holy spirit. dear friends in christ, and the name of jesus and his church, we gather together to pray for edward kennedy, that god may bring him to the everlasting peace and rest. we share the pain of loss but the promise of eternal light gives us, and therefore we comfort one another with these words. cara? >> i am reading from a letter of paul. [inaudible] you will
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5